Intractable, or Things Not Taken Back

Her words seek to pause her,

insisting that she consider the hornets’ nest.

She responds,

“I know what intractable means,

but how do you unrape someone?”*

I’ve thought about this question

in the hours before I fall asleep

and in the mornings while I ready myself.

Each time I heed her point,

seeing on a vivid stage both the hornet flying,

and the hornet’s wings ripped off.

Sometimes tormentors exist

to force words to be uttered.

To lay bare what we have pushed down.

To expose unspeakable truths,

and the power they can yield over us.

Not only us though,

as was the point wielded to chastise.

When we take what has changed our worlds,

and threaten to let it change the world,

we can be sure that the devil will react.

The voice of permanence

seeks to taunt us

with how much worse things can get.

Staring us down

with instruments of challenge,

through characters we see as ourselves.

Those who stand to lose something.

Those who have lost control over us.

Those who behold our power

as the weapon it can become.

Missing that such weapons

never get laid down by aggressors,

and that by the time we consider

picking up our tools for survival,

the pull of self defense has reached us.

That pull,

the one we easily walk away from,

perhaps is the true image

of what remains intractable.

Words of life we speak out

when we’re most ready to die,

and perhaps least ready to fight ourselves.

*reference from Queen Sugar, season 1

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Writer. Thinker. Facilitator. Advocate. Invested in accountability for power based violence, creative initiatives, and meaningful, nuanced dialoguing.

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Amanda Lindamood

Writer. Thinker. Facilitator. Advocate. Invested in accountability for power based violence, creative initiatives, and meaningful, nuanced dialoguing.